UFOlogy in a Field

Scientific tests have ruled out the possibility that big cats were responsible for the deaths of two roe deers whose remains were found in Gloucestershire.

What’s that got to do with UFOs?  Well apart from the fact that some ‘independent thinkers’ blame such mysterious deaths on ET, UFOlogy and big cat-ology shares quite a lot of common ground.

Reduced to its basic constituents, what we have are a large number of ‘credible witnesses’ who claim to have seen extraordinary things (a leopard or black panther, presumably wearing thermals, on the loose in rural Gloucestershire).

As is the case with UFOlogists, those who believe that ABCs (alien big cats) exist point to so-called ‘physical evidence’ (animal carcasses, footprints, etc) as proof. When such ‘evidence’ is discovered it leads to great excitement. Journalists spread the story, bringing others out of the woodwork who have seen big cats, so the mystery increases.

But then results from DNA tests on the carcasses of two roe deers, commissioned by the National Trust, come back negative. The tests found evidence of foxes, but no trace of anything on vacation from the Serengeti. How many times have we been presented with dodgy UFO photos and ‘evidence’ (such as the notorious wind-farm propeller struck by an ET craft), that dissolves when placed under critical scrutiny.

Remains of one roe deer found in Gloucestershire (credit: Daily Telegraph)

UFOs and big cat-logy has another similarity. The Government (in the form of Natural England) says there aren’t any big cats, despite mountains of ‘eyewitness’ evidence to the contrary. And there’s even a faction within the big cat fraternity who believe the government secretly know that big cats exist but are covering up the truth because they don’t want people to panic.

Sounds familiar?  UFOlogy in a field.

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9 Responses to UFOlogy in a Field

  1. Ross says:

    Big cats have been observed to morph into UFOs (and vice versa). Also, contrary to popular opinion, not all UFOs are silent. Some purr.

  2. There is little of substance to any of the claims in this article and it has been crafted in such a way as to suggest that your opinion is definitive, which it is not.

    I know little of the Big Cat phenomenon in the UK apart from one incident that was a little too close for comfort. One warm summers afternoon approximately twelve years ago, my sister was out in her back garden hanging out some washing. She was chatting with a neighbour who was also hanging out her washing when suddenly the neighbour screamed. My sister turned her head to face the direction in which her neighbour was looking, and there at the bottom of her garden was a large, black cat. The garden backs onto farmland and although most of it is well kept, the bottom end was fairly wild with long grass, Hawthorn and Brambles in abundance. The ‘Cat’ had emerged from a gap between a Bramble and Hawthorn bush and was standing there studying the two women in plain view. According to both women the ‘Cat’ was about the height of a large German Shepherd dog but was somewhat longer in the body. Despite the distance, about 35 feet by the way, both women clearly described the animal as a large, black feline with golden hued eyes. My sister yelled for her husband which seemed to spook the creature and it turned on its heels and crept back through the gap. They both reported the incident to the local Police who confirmed that their’s was not the only report they had received about the animal that day. My sister is not one for making up stories, for instance she has no interest in UFO’s or the like. Her neighbour was a court employee (I’m not sure of her exact role but she is no longer with us unfortunately) and I regard both of them as having integrity.

    Now let me address the UFO issue: Granted, many UFO sightings are reported by people who might be a little bored and/or are looking to shake people up a bit, or who are just downright dishonest. Then there are those that make you sit up and take notice. One such incident occurred on November 7th 2006 at 16:15 CST in Chicago.

    O’Hare International Airport is one of the busiest of its ilk in the world. What happened on this overcast and grim afternoon is not only remarkable for what was observed by multiple professional witnesses over the facility, but also for the way the incident was ignored and eventually swept under the carpet by United Airlines and the FAA, despite there being a tangible risk of collision for air traffic both approaching and departing O’Hare. Rather than launch into an essay, I will post a link to a PDF document of the official NARCAP report which was professionally researched and recorded in the manner of an FAA report, which one would reasonably expect to be generated by an incident which involved substantive risk to domestic air traffic.

    Here is the link, it makes for an interesting read:
    http://www.narcap.org/reports/TR10_Case_18a.pdf

  3. John says:

    I have no idea why you are linking Big Cats to UFOlogy? With a little research you would have found that it is generally accepted and proven that Big Cats exist in the wild in the UK…there is no mystery. Visit Inverness museum and you will see a stuffed Black Panther….caught in a drop trap decades ago near Elgin, Moray. As far as I am aware as yet we have no stuffed aliens.

    • Generally accepted by whom?
      By big cat-ologists?
      The analogy is obvious.
      And as for stuffed aliens, there are plenty of UFO-ologists who would argue alien cadavers exist and are being hidden away by the gov’ment. UFO-logists would argue that it’s “generally accepted” (by some 50% of the US population) that aliens crashed at Roswell.
      So your point is what precisely?

      • Ross says:

        John has pointed out that a black panther trapped in the UK exists, stuffed, in the Inverness museum. Alien cadavers may be RUMORED to exist, but there is no proof that they do. That is surely an important difference. So why continue to automatically equate UK Big Cat reports with UFO reports? What is your point? Just trying to save face? Ego should have no place in these matters.

      • So John has pointed out ‘that a black panther trapped in the UK exists, stuffed, in the Inverness museum’ so therefore it must true!
        I think not. The cat in Inverness Museum is actually a puma (not black, or a panther) who was, according to the Scottish Big Cat Trust, not wild but ‘a pet who… was exceptionally tame’ and was also ‘old and arthritic’. The SBCT believe she probably escaped from a wildlife park, so was hardly ‘captured in the wild’. When she died in 1985 she was stuffed and can be seen in the Inverness Museum today.
        The Trust’s own website says ‘Felicity the puma is often cited as evidence that there are non-native cats at large in the UK…others believe that her capture was a staged event.’
        The museum also has a Scottish Wildcat on display (actually a native species), several of which have been captured or killed. But these are not ‘big cats’ or leopards of the type you might meet on the African plains!
        The facts remain as I stated them: there is no evidence that black panthers, leopards or other big cats are on the loose in the UK. Back in the 1970s when the dangerous animals act was passed some real big cats may have been released into the wild; but if so, it’s unlikely they could breed without anyone in this tiny island finding some evidence. Despite thousands of sightings and claims of ‘physical evidence’ no one has so trapped one or found any convincing physical evidence of their existence. Fact. The Inverness puma doesn’t count, it’s a red herring.
        This, Ross, is “my point”, which I thought I had made perfectly clear.
        Quite where my ego comes into this, I have no idea. I suspect the problem you have, given the number of times you pop up, is an intolerance of others expressing their point of view. If you don’t like my views then don’t read them. No one is forcing you to visit my website. If you don’t like skepticism then go somewhere more suited to your point of view.

  4. I lived for about eight years on the end of a peninsular on the west coast of scotland. during that time I saw three big cats ( not scottish wild cats ) the first sighting was very close and was of a large black cat ( about the size of a large dog ) it had just caught something in the long grass behind my cottage. when it saw me, it ran up a long stone wall, quicker than anything I have seen before. it held out its long tail horizontaly as it ran. on two other occasions, I saw big cats run in front of my car at night. there is no doubt that they exsist in the uk….Alan Price

  5. Ross says:

    Thanks for the clarification regarding the “black panther” of Inverness Museum.

    I have nothing against “skepticism” per se. In fact, my first comment (February 9, 2012) on “UFOlogy in a Field” was intended as a humorous poke at believers.

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